Central PA's LGBT News Source

An overview:

Intimate partner violence in LGBT & HIV-affected communities

By Louie Marven
Posted 1/2/18

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) released its report Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Intimate Partner Violence in 2016. The report looks at the …

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An overview:

Intimate partner violence in LGBT & HIV-affected communities

Posted

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) released its report Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and HIV-Affected Intimate Partner Violence in 2016. The report looks at the experiences of 2,032 survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) who reported to 14 NCAVP member organizations from 9 states across the country, including California, Texas, New York, Arizona, Illinois, Massachusetts, Ohio, Vermont, and Missouri.
Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a serious yet oft-ignored issue facing LGBT and HIV-affected communities. The 2016 National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP) report looks at the unique and intersectional ways that LGBT and HIV-affected people experience IPV, as well as the barriers they experience when attempting to access care and support. Key findings include:

  1. ·LGBT and HIV-affected people of color made up 60% of the reports of IPV homicides, and 59% of the total number of survivors who reported to NCAVP members in 2016. 
  2. ·There was an increase in the percentage of survivors who identified as Latinx from 24% in 2015 to 30% in 2016. 
  3. ·LGBTQ and HIV-affected people under the age of 40 made up 73% of the reports of IPV homicides, and 66% of the total number of survivors who reported to NCAVP members in 2016. 
  4. ·Survivors reporting experiencing sexual violence within IPV increased from 4% in 2015 to 7% in 2016. 
  5. · Transgender women were 2.5 times more likely to be stalked, 2.5 times more likely to experience financial violence, and 2 times more likely to experience online harassment within IPV, compared to survivors who were not transgender women. 
  6. ·Both transgender and gender non-conforming survivors and Latinx survivors were 3 times more likely to experience violence by an ex-partner. 
  7. · The most common services sought by LGBTQ survivors of IPV were legal, housing and mental health advocacy, safety planning and emergency funds. 

The findings of this report are being released in a political climate where rights and protections for LGBT people are in jeopardy. “NCAVP’s report shows a greater need than ever to understand the unique ways LGBTQ and HIV-affected communities experience IPV, and to reach our communities with vital information, resources, and services,” said Beverly Tillery, Executive Director of the New York City Anti-Violence Project. “Yet LGBT people’s legal rights and protections are being eroded daily by the Trump administration only making LGBTQ communities more vulnerable to violence.”